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Professor links incarcerated parents, families

By Erin Zagursky
July 23, 2008
Danielle Dallaire, an assistant professor of biology, is helping to evaluate Linkages: Building Strong Connections.

W&M professor’s film project brings a taste of Hollywood to campus

By Staff
July 16, 2008

Theater, speech and dance professor Martin Fusi films a feature length movie in Williamsburg with Hollywood actor Larry Holden.

Work continues for retiring professors

By Bruce Ebert
July 16, 2008

Snapshot of several faculty members who will retire this summer after distinguished careers at the College of William and Mary.

Reiss: The art of negotiation (video feature)

By David Williard
July 14, 2008

Mitchell Reiss, vice provost for international affairs at the College of William and Mary, discusses negotiating with evil regimes, advising Bono and the bold steps made by Princess Diana during a video interview.

Swaddle: Diverse bird population is good for human health

By Joe McClain
June 25, 2008

Researchers from the College of William and Mary have discovered that what’s good for an area’s bird population also is good for people living nearby—especially during an outbreak of West Nile virus.

Selling the candidates: Evans' students create campaign ads

By David Williard
June 23, 2008
Students in Larry Evans' government 370 class at the College of William and Mary got at the heart of the legislative process by producing their own campaign spots.

Strong named to commission on postal reforms

By Staff
June 20, 2008

John Strong, CSX Professor of Finance, has been appointed to a National Academy of Sciences Study Commission to examine prospective changes to the United States Postal Service (USPS).

Abraham named Fulbright Scholar

By Ellen Buck
June 19, 2008

Dorothea La Abraham, a professor in the School of Business at the College of William and Mary, has been named a Fulbright Scholar.

Off the page: King on 'Evolving God'

By David Williard
May 23, 2008

Barbara King, a biological anthropologist at the College of William and Mary, discusses her provocative book Evolving God.

When scholars inform public policy

By Staff
May 5, 2008

Three professors at the College of William and Mary, William Fisher, Harvey Langholtz and J. Timmons Roberts, reflect upon the intersection of scholarship and public policy.

Wallach to Williams next semester (w/audio)

By David Williard
April 16, 2008

Alan Wallach, the College’s Ralph H. Wark Professor of Art and Art History and American Studies, has been invited to serve as the Robert Sterling Clark Distinguished Professor of Art History at Williams College’s Clark Institute in Williamstown, MA, during the fall 2008 semester.

Off the page: Joyce on appropriating the Victorians

By David Williard
March 27, 2008

Off the page interview with Simon Joyce, associate professor of English at William and Mary, regarding his book "The Victorians in the Rearview Mirror."

Spring Break: Reports from Nicaragua

By David Aday
March 4, 2008

David Aday, professor of sociology and American studies, writes first-person reports from Nicaragua during his participation in a Students for Healthy Communities Spring Break service trip.

Friedrichs receives Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award

By Joe McClain
February 21, 2008
Carl Friedrichs, an oceanographer at VIMS, received the Commonwealth’s highest honor for professors.

Prokhorov gets Jefferson Teaching Award

By Erin Zagursky
February 7, 2008
In recognition of his devotion to students and his passion for teaching, Alexander Prokhorov will receive the Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award from the College of William and Mary.

Holmes honored with Jefferson Award

By David Williard
February 7, 2008
David Holmes, the Walter G. Mason Professor of Religion, received the Thomas Jefferson Award from William and Mary on Charter Day 2008. 

King at AAAS: Scientists writing about religion

By Joe McClain
February 6, 2008

In writing and talking about the intersection of science and religion, William and Mary anthropologist Barbara King refuses to discuss the nature of her own faith—and she wishes more scientists would do the same.

Musick honored for lifetime opus

By Dave Malmquist
February 4, 2008

Jack Musick, of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, has been awarded the Commonwealth's Lifetime Achievement in Science award

Friedrichs receives Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award

By Joe McClain
January 28, 2008

Carl Friedrichs, an oceanographer at the School of Marine Science/Virginia Institute of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary, has received the Commonwealth’s highest honor for professors.

Koloski: Toward 'Great, Public and Global'

By David Williard
January 11, 2008

Lauri Koloski, associate professor of history and director of the Reves Center for International Studies at the College of William and Mary, shares her thoughts in a video interview concerning internationalizing the university.

W&M service-learning takes students further

By Erin Zagursky
January 7, 2008
(Includes video) Lynn Pelco discusses service-learning and civic engagement at the College of William and Mary.

Cost, consumption, citizenship and Christmas

By David Williard
December 18, 2007

Charles McGovern, associate professor of American studies and of history at the College, talks about the themes in his book Sold American: Consumption and Citizenship, 1890-1945.

VIMS scientists to study blue-crab disease

By Dave Malmquist
December 17, 2007

Jeffrey Shields of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science has received a five-year, $2.4 million federal grant to study how fishing pressure and declines in water quality affect blue crabs in Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Avoided deforestation: Keep the trees and make the rain forest pay

By Joe McClain
December 10, 2007

J. Timmons Roberts, professor of sociology at the College, co-authored an article for "Science" that proposes a system of paying governments to restrict logging and other destructive uses  of their rain forests.

Nelson and Sheriff reveal a messier Civil War

By David Williard
December 4, 2007
Scott Nelson and Carol Sheriff had a goal when they began co-writing A People at War: Civilians and Soldiers in America’s Civil War, 1854-1877. They wanted to make the war “messier.”

 

Malone warns of global-warming 'disaster'

By Alan Kennedy-Shaffer
November 30, 2007

Law Professor Linda Malone urged the William and Mary community to do more to prevent global warming in this year’s St. George Tucker Lecture at the Marshall-Wythe School of Law on Nov. 29.

Fabrizio elected AFS president

By Dave Malmquist
November 27, 2007

Associate Professor Mary Fabrizio of the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciencehas been elected President of the 9,000-member American Fisheries Society (AFS).

Patterson to lead SeaCamel aquanauts

By Dave Malmquist
November 6, 2007

Mark Patterson of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, will lead a team of aquanauts as they present six live underwater broadcasts between November 12 and 14 from Aquarius, America's "Inner Space Station" and the world's only undersea habitat.

Robbins inspires writers at alma mater

By Alan Kennedy-Shaffer
October 26, 2007
Bestselling novelist David Robbins is serving as writer-in-residence at his alma mater.

Two W&M professors receive Fulbrights

By Erin Zagursky
October 18, 2007

Barnard and Hahamovitch, recipients of Fulbright grants, will spend the spring 2008 semester conducting research overseas.

Greenia receives Spanish honor

By Erin Zagursky
October 16, 2007
A professor known for his work in medieval studies received Spain’s highest cultural achievement distinction for foreign nationals.

Alumni Association honors five faculty

By Eric Pesola
October 5, 2007

The Alumni Association presented its fellowship awards to five faculty members on Sept. 29

Optical illusions reveal how the brain works

By Joe McClain
October 4, 2007

A group of William and Mary scientists is conducting experiements based on subjects' reactions to the Ebbinghaus illusion.

Schwartz: Leadership and civic disengagement

By David Williard
October 1, 2007

“Leadership” and “service”: When it comes to civic engagement, Joel Schwartz wants to change the subject.

VIMS fellow briefs U.S. Senate on Bay warming

By Dave Malmquist
September 25, 2007

VIMS fellow Christopher Pyke will help brief an influential Senate committee this Wednesday, Sept 26, on the impacts of global warming on Chesapeake Bay.

Hulse composition to be featured by Duo46

By Erin Zagursky
September 24, 2007

The Ewell Concert Series will kick off its 2007-08 season with a performance that will include a composition by one of William and Mary’s faculty members, Brian Hulse.

Aday ponders civic-engagement success

By David Williard
September 13, 2007

The model of civic engagement that has achieved incredible success at William and Mary has been initiated by students and must continue to be led by them, says David Aday, professor of sociology.

NSF brings computational math to undergrads

By Chi-Kwong Li, David Lutzer
September 11, 2007
A team of professors at William and Mary has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant worth approximately $800,000 to bring computational mathematics into the undergraduate curricula.

Background Radiation: Talking poetry with Hart

By David Williard
August 8, 2007

Henry Hart's new book of poetry, Background Radiation, casts a poetic glow on the bloody and nightmarish traces embedded in humankind.

Q&A with Stock: Street filmmaking in Cuba

By Staff
July 11, 2007

Although she was in Minnesota on a research leave, many people in the local community heard Ann Marie Stock, professor of Hispanic studies and film studies at William and Mary, on "With Good Reason," a statewide public affairs program broadcast on National Public Radio. She talked about filmmaking in Cuba.

Fuchs: Toward reasoned communication

By David Williard
July 10, 2007

Philosophy professor Alan Fuchs, who received the College Thomas Ashley Graves Jr. Award for sustained excellence in teaching, has made it his passion to help students take a reasonable approach to complex contemporary issues.

Out of Context: Faculty in the media

By Staff
July 2, 2007

Selected quotes from members of the College's faculty as they appeared in the nation's media between April 2007  and June 2007.

VIMS pair to advance queen conch studies

By Dave Malmquist
June 28, 2007
Professor John Hoenig of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, has been invited to participate in the third annual Stock Assessment Meeting of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism. CRFM is an international treaty organization dedicated to wise use of fishery resources in the Caribbean.

Borgenicht and Kambis: High-altitude friendship

By David Williard
May 10, 2007
The relationship that grew between Jack Borgenicht (1911-2005), a New Jersey businessman, and Ken Kambis, professor of kinesiology at the College, could inform an epic.

Bechtold: Diplomacy in limbo

By David Williard
April 26, 2007
To hear Peter Bechtold tell it, media reports that connect a “death-of-diplomacy” theory with recent foreign-policy initiatives undertaken by the United States are exaggerated.

Whittenburg Q&A: Who settled Jamestown?

By David Williard
April 19, 2007
James Whittenburg, associate professor of history and chair of the Lyon Gardiner Tyler Department of History, shares insights concerning Jamestown.

Van Alstyne questions domestic spying

By Kaila M Gregory (JD '09)
April 13, 2007
William W. Van Alstyne, one of the foremost constitutional scholars in the nation, has signed on to collaborative briefs dealing with the domestic spying program and suspension of the writ of habeas corpus.

Daileader gambles on "Dark Ages"

By David Williard
March 23, 2007
When Philip Daileader agreed to appear on a History Channel special on the Dark Ages, he hoped the show would cause viewers to ask questions.

Kijanowska prepares for New York debut

By Erin Zagursky
March 22, 2007
Anna Kijanowska, music instructor at the College, is preparing for her New York City debut.

Music 1607: Class has timely Jamestown tie

By Suzanne Seurattan
March 22, 2007
Ruth van Baak Griffioen is enjoying the attention her course is receiving thanks to the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown.

Graves wins International Game Fish Award

By Dave Malmquist
March 14, 2007
The International Game Fish Association (IGFA) has honored Virginia Institute of Marine Science Professor John Graves with their individual Conservation Award for 2006.

"Ramayana La'ar": A play for diversity

By David Williard
March 13, 2007
Record numbers of people viewed the Main Stage production of "Ramayana La'ar," a turnout that its director says underscores openness to diversity at William and Mary.

Slevin: Naming diversity

By Staff
March 1, 2007
Upon receiving the College's Thomas Jefferson Award, Kate Slevin, Chancellor Professor of Sociology, spoke about diversity in her classrooms.

Whittenburg saluted as 'greatest' teacher

By Erin Zagursky
February 22, 2007
Former students gather to honor Jim Whittenburg as the "greatest" history teacher of all time.

King sees pre-human precursor to religion

By Joe McClain
February 15, 2007
Anthropology professor Barbara King says evidence of belongingness in pre-humans indicates a religious tendency.

Slevin gets Thomas Jefferson Award

By Erin Zagursky
February 12, 2007
Kate Slevin, William and Mary’s chancellor professor of sociology, has been named the recipient of the college’s 2007 Thomas Jefferson Award.

Mathematician wins Jefferson teaching award

By Joe McClain
February 12, 2007
Vladimir Bolotnikov received the 2007 Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award.

Two W&M faculty members receive Commonwealth’s top award

By Erin Zagursky
February 9, 2007
Two faculty members at the College of William and Mary have received the Commonwealth’s highest honor for professors.

Race question marks Prices' Bearden book

By David Williard
February 8, 2007
He was America's greatest collagist, but his name is missing from the Grove Dictionary of Art. That is one of the ironies Richard and Sally Price discussed in their new book, Romare Bearden: The Caribbean Dimension.

Ivanova seeks environmental leadership

By David Williard
January 24, 2007
In the aftermath of George W. Bush's State of the Union message, Maria Ivanova still is looking for environmental leadership to emerge.

Globalization neither new nor inevitable

By David Williard
January 8, 2007
The onward march of globalization is not a foregone conclusion, Carl Strikwerda told a Christopher Wren Association audience.

Calderon shows symbolism and substance

By George Grayson
December 15, 2006
A first-person essay was written by George W. Grayson, Class of 1938 Professor of Government at the College, after he attended the inauguration of Felipe Calderón as president of Mexico on Dec. 1.

AIDS funding problematic despite increases

By David Williard
December 13, 2006
Recent infusions of cash into the global AIDS fight could become problematic if care for the sick is done at the expense of prevention, said Susan Peterson, professor of government.

Jazz great inspires students

By Erin Zagursky
December 13, 2006
Jazz musician Donald "Duck" Harrison sweats the small stuff, and he expects that same from William and Mary students.

Orth helps shine light on global seagrass crisis

By Dave Malmquist
December 1, 2006
VIMS professor Robert Orth is co-author of a report indicating that the seagrass problems of the Chesapeake Bay are global in scale.

College hosts national ethnohistory event

By David Williard
November 16, 2006
By all accounts, the annual meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory hosted at the College Nov. 1-5 was an unqualified success.

Allen's gaffes set stage for Webb win

By David Williard
November 16, 2006
Ron Rapoport, professor of government, believes campaign miscues by Sen. George Allen opened the door for his challenger, Jim Webb, to win his seat.

Do not give up on the environment

By David Williard
November 2, 2006
Researchers at VIMS conducted a mini-school at the Science Museum of Virginia titled "Global Warming in the Chesapeake Bay."

College election pundits: Who needs CNN?

By Jennifer Sykes ('07)
November 2, 2006
Professors in the College's government department are as insightful as analysts touted by mainstream news networks.

Writing comes from living, says Brakenbury

By David Williard
October 19, 2006
One has to live in order to write, the College's writer-in-residence told students during a reading of her work.

Environmentalists in the Boardroom

By David Williard
October 12, 2006
Environmentalists in the Boardroom was the title of the 2006 Distinguished Faculty Lecture delivered by Sarah Stafford, associate professor of government at the College.

Q&A with Stafford: Toward a cleaner world

By Staff
October 12, 2006
Sarah Stafford dicusses the environment, the politics of the EPA and some of her ideas for a cleaner world.

The Inquisition: Is it relevant to Guantanamo?

By David Williard
September 28, 2006
Lu Ann Homza knows that readers of her recent book The Spanish Inquisition: 1478-1614 will perceive parallels to current debates about the treatment of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

Welsh's Enigma: A cryptological collection

By David Williard
September 26, 2006
Robert Welsh has a fully functioning Enigma machine among his personal collection of cryptological devices.

'Who Killed the Electric Car?' debated

By David Williard
September 22, 2006
The documentary 'Who Killed the Electric Car?' used as a primer for undergraduates in the business school.

Talking Judaism and baseball with Raphael

By David Williard
September 21, 2006
Marc Raphael, professor of Judaic studies, talks about his recent book What is Jewish About America's "Favorite Pastime"?

College's CHEM 103 among best nationwide

By Joe McClain
September 20, 2006
William and Mary’s CHEM 103 was singled out in a national study of chemistry courses conducted by the Center for Educational Policy Research.

Schoenberger’s book is behind 'Hollywoodland'

By David Williard
August 31, 2006
"Hollywoodland," the movie about the death of George Reeves, the TV Superman, is based on a book co-written by Nancy Schoenberger, professor of English at the College.

Chaloupka: Why physics at William and Mary?

By Jan Chaloupka
August 31, 2006
Jan Chaloupka makes the case for studying physics at the College.

'Hubris' fuels Israeli and U.S. mistakes in the Middle East says Wilkerson

By David Williard
August 24, 2006
Incursion this summer by Israeli military forces into southern Lebanon represents only “the most recent indication of failed policies in the Middle East,” said Lawrence Wilkerson, visiting professor of government.

Q&A: Reiss on North Korea, Iran and other 'hot spots'

By Suzanne Seurattan
July 13, 2006
Mitchell Reiss, vice provost for international affairs, discusses the world's hot spots beginning with the nuclear ambitions of North Korea and Iran.

Finding John Henry: Nelson reveals where the bodies are buried

By David Williard
July 13, 2006
The real John Henry was a convict who was forced to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. It killed him, according to Scott Nelson, associate professor of history at the College.

Q&A with Nelson: Beyond the myth of John Henry

By Staff
July 13, 2006

Q&A with Scott Nelson, associate professor of history, who discusses his discovery of the real John Henry as detailed in his new book Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend (to be published in October 2006).

Capstone proposal is heart of reaccreditation process

By William T. Walker
May 25, 2006
David Aday, director of William and Mary’s reaccreditation effort, gave a presentation to a group of visiting academics representing the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

Professors honored during commencement

By Staff
May 25, 2006
Professors Herrington Bryce of the Mason School of Business and Paul Marcus of the William and Mary Law School were honored during the College’s commencement ceremonies. Bryce was named the recipient of the 2006 Thomas Ashley Graves Jr. Award. Marcus received the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award.

Galano’s students learn to give psychology away

By David Williard
May 25, 2006
Joseph Galano, associate professor of psychology, sends students upstream to improve the human condition.

Excellence in teaching: Driving students beyond the boxes

By David Williard
April 17, 2006

Several professors who have earned distinctions for excellence the in classroom discuss the liberal-arts tradition and the evaluative process at William and Mary.

Wilkerson delivers insights about wars and policies

By Suzanne Seurattan
March 30, 2006
Larry Wilkerson’s teaching philosophy is simple. He wants his students, most of whom are headed to careers in public service, to leave his class with knowledge that will help them enter the working world smarter than he was when he started.

Pinson’s 'Changing the Changes' delivers more than the blues

By David Williard
March 10, 2006
Hermine Pinson's CD "Changing the Changes," is a feast of poetry merged with song.

College’s writer-in-residence dissatisfied with Hollywood’s treatment of ‘The Evidence’

By David Williard
March 8, 2006
Ian Caldwell, writer for the forthcoming ABC cop series "The Evidence," recounts his impressions of the Hollywood creative process.

Q&A with Caldwell: A new cop-show formula

By Staff
March 8, 2006
Ian Caldwell, writer for "The Evidence,” a television series scheduled to premier on ABC in March, talks about coming up with and selling a new-formula production in Hollywood.

BOV approves faculty promotions

By Suzanne Seurattan
February 27, 2006
The College’s Board of Visitors approved three designated professorships at its February meeting. In addition, it approved 18 faculty members for tenure and promoted 15 others.

Three William and Mary professors receive state’s top award

By Staff
February 24, 2006
Three faculty members at the College of William and Mary have received the Commonwealth of Virginia’s highest honor for professors of the colleges and universities in the state.

Professors say the avian flu virus is coming to Virginia: Don’t panic

By David Williard
February 16, 2006
Perhaps it will be the millions of migrating blackpoll warblers that will bring the avian flu virus to Williamsburg when they arrive from Alaska this autumn. Perhaps it will be some other species. Regardless, H5N1 will come to Virginia, where it will, if all goes as several William and Mary professors predict, take up residence indefinitely in local wild-bird populations. At that point, one of those professors, Dan Cristol, associate professor of biology at the College, will be among the first human beings locally to be at risk.

Q&A with Frederick Smith: Caribbean rum

By Staff
February 9, 2006
Frederick Smith, assistant professor of anthropology at the College, recently published Carribean Rum: A Social and Economic History, a book about the impact of rum in the region.

Canuel selected for teaching award

By Brian Whitson
February 2, 2006
Elizabeth Canuel, associate professor at the College’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), will be awarded with the 2006 Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award at Charter Day on Feb. 11.

Schwartz to receive Thomas Jefferson Award at Charter Day

By David Williard
February 2, 2006

When Joel Schwartz, director of the Charles Center, steps up to the Charter Day microphones on Feb. 11 to accept the College’s Thomas Jefferson Award for career contributions to William and Mary, he will have three minutes to speak.

Response to Ely’s Israel on the Appomattox continues

By David Williard
January 20, 2006
The incredible run of Melvin Patrick Ely’s book Israel on the Appomattox, which began nearly a year and a half ago, continued this month as the American Historical Association (AHA) gave it the Albert J. Beveridge Award as the best book of 2004 on American history along with its Wesley-Logan Prize as the outstanding book dealing with the history of the African diaspora. Two juries cited Ely’s work as a “beautifully crafted history” and as “meticulous and moving.”

Hoffman receives editing award for Dear Papa, Dear Charley

By David Williard
January 20, 2006
Ronald Hoffman, director of the College’s Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, recently won the 2005 J. Franklin Jameson Award from the American Historical Association (AHA) for the three-volume collection of letters Dear Papa, Dear Charley: The Peregrinations of a Revolutionary Aristocrat.

Q&A with Ely: Current issues of race

By Staff
January 19, 2006
For more than a year, Melvin Ely has been touring the region—and the nation—discussing his book, Israel on the Appomattox, which deals with the relationships between free blacks and their white neighbors prior to the Civil War. The discussion has contributed to his understanding of current issues of race.

Van Dover delivers podcast from Antarctica

By Suzanne Seurattan
January 17, 2006
Cindy Van Dover delivers podcast from Antarctica.

Q&A with Rapoport: The validity of Perot and third parties

By Suzanne Seurattan
January 17, 2006
Ron Rapoport recently published Three's a Crowd, which was inspired by the success of the Perot campaign. In this exchange, he talks about Perot's success and the impact it continues to have in the present.

Stranded on the rock of St. Michael
The pilgrim adventures of John Conlee

By John Conlee
January 11, 2006
After 14 years, John Conlee, professor of English at the College, resumed his pilgrimage to Skellig Michael, a rocky outcropping off the coast of Ireland.

Music and the whole person

By Staff
November 28, 2005
James Armstrong, director of choirs at the College, considers the role of music within the liberal-arts tradition at William and Mary.

Q&A with Hahamovitch: Who gets the deportation card?

By David Williard
November 22, 2005
As long as employers hold the deportation card, working conditions for international farmworkers in the United States may remain marginal, at best, says Cindy Hahamovitch, associate professor of history, who is writing a history of the H-2 (guest-worker) program in the United States.

Byrd recounts 50 years
They call him the man who saved the eagles

By Tim Jones
November 17, 2005

Mitchell Byrd, the man whom many credit with saving the eagles, recounts his 50 years of connections to William and Mary.

Tribe Aid showcases staff and faculty talent

By Staff
November 11, 2005
Faculty and staff members at the College revealed numerous talents as they put on a benefit show to help victims of Hurricane Katrina recover.

Griffin delivers distinguished faculty lecture on thermoregulation

By Joe McClain
November 3, 2005
John Griffin, associate professor of biology and coordinator of the College’s interdisciplinary program in neuroscience presented “Thermoregulation—Fever and Hot Flashes … Oh My!” recently at the Seventh Annual Dean’s Distinguished Faculty Lecture.

Risks in rebuilding New Orleans are topic for panel

By Brian Whitson
November 3, 2005
A panel discussion of Katrina and rebuilding in New Orleans welcomed Erin Ryan, assistant professor of law, J. Timmons Roberts, professor of sociology and director of environmental science and environmental studies at the College, and Ron Rosenberg, professor of law.

Katrina in the Chesapeake? VIMS model removes the guesswork

By Suzanne Seurattan
October 20, 2005
What might the impact be in this region if a storm the size and strength of Katrina were to hit Chesapeake Bay?
With the help of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), no imagination is necessary because Harry Wang can show what the effects might be. Wang, an associate professor of marine science at VIMS and a member of the estuarine and coastal modeling group (ECMG) there, along with his colleagues Jian Shen, a research assistant professor, and Wenping Gong, a visiting scientist, put together a simulation that uses a computational model to demonstrate the impact of a category 4 hurricane on the Bay region.

2005 Raft Debate
Ducklow victorious in defense of natural science

By Tim Jones
October 14, 2005
The College’s annual Raft Debate, invited its audience to watch as a scientist, a social scientist and a humanist—sole survivors of an imaginary shipwreck—debated the values of their respective discipline for the rest of humanity.

U.S. bosses rated B+ by College’s business school

By Gail Kent
October 14, 2005
So. You have the boss from hell? Well, you’re in the minority, according to a national survey conducted by the School of Business at the College of William and Mary.

Q&A with Roberts: Considering the lessons of Hurricane Katrina

By Suzanne Seurattan
October 10, 2005
J. Timmons Roberts, director of the environmental science/studies at the College and a former resident of New Orleans, offers insights on the lessons that should be learned in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Pilgrimage as therapy

By George Greenia
September 22, 2005
In this first-person article, reprinted from the American Pilgrim magazine, George Greenia, professor of modern languages and literatures, contemplates his first pilgrimage in terms of a mid-life crisis and a medieval punishment.

Professor takes service-learning to Eastern Shore

By Brian Whitson
September 8, 2005
Jonathan Arries, an associate professor of modern languages and literatures and University Professor for Teaching Excellence at William and Mary leads groups of students to the Eastern Shore each summer to work for four weeks as volunteer interpreters for farm workers and medical staff who treat them.

Van Alstyne appreciates the irony of Constitution Day law

By Brian Whitson
September 8, 2005

Considered one of the top constitutional legal minds of his time, William W. Van Alstyne, Alfred Wilson and Mary I. W. Lee Professor of Law at the College’s Marshall-Wythe School of Law, has given countless lectures and presentations on his favorite subject—the world’s oldest Constitution. However, those programs were never part of a law mandated by Congress. So when Van Alstyne was first asked to present a program at the College on Constitution Day, a new Congress-approved requirement for institutions that receive federal funding, his first thought was of the irony.

Tracking aid: Researchers build international database

By Meghan Williams ('05)
August 24, 2005
In another 5 or 10 years, world leaders may be citing data from PLAID, or Project-Level Aid, a research venture led by a group from William and Mary when assessing the validity of developmental aid.

Apes and humans
Communicating the differences

By Cindy Baker
August 24, 2005

Class of 2007 Professor of Anthropology at William and Mary Barbara King’s most recently published book, The Dynamic Dance: Nonverbal Communication in African Great Apes, explores nonverbal communication in bonobo and gorilla families.

Choosing a justice: Nemacheck looks behind the choreography

By Suzanne Seurattan
August 14, 2005
Christine Nemacheck, assistant professor of government, looks behind the scenes at the process of selecting a Supreme Court Justice.

Werowocomoco 2005
More than treasure uncovered during field school

By Tim Jones
August 9, 2005
The extent of the ditches uncovered below the plow zone throughout Werowocomoco, the primary residence of Chief Powhatan, is providing excitement during the 2005 field school at the site.

‘Writing with light’ helps English professor clarify passions
Zuber has fallen in love with the documentary-film genre

By David Williard
July 14, 2005
Sharon Zuber’s experience as a teacher of composition has prepared her to tackle film documentaries.

Challenges of China
Observations from the EMBA blog

By staff
July 14, 2005
Excerpts from the EMBA China blog. Students used the online venue to post either daily observations during their trip to China or to post their final summations following the journey.

Pessimism, politics and joy: Q&A with Hans Tiefel

By David Williard
May 20, 2005
Between his last class as a member of the faculty at the College and his scheduled presentation of the baccalaureate address, Hans Tiefel spoke about teaching, joy and a source of pessimism in his own life.

Q&A with College’s vice provost
Assessing the world with Mitchell Reiss

By Suzanne Seurattan
May 3, 2005
Mitchell Reiss, former dean of international affairs and director of the Reves Center for International Studies, has returned to the College as vice provost for international affairs after serving for a year and a half as director of policy and planning for the U.S. Department of State. We asked him to assess our world.

Bats and science: Hinders explores sonar technology

By Joe McClain
April 5, 2005
Mark Hinders, associate professor of applied science, is leading out in echolocation research.

Islamic law class prepares students for a globalized world

By Brian Whitson
March 23, 2005
Professor Christie Warren at the William and Mary Law School is teaching a new course this semester on Islamic Law. It's a course her students asked for in an effort to learn more about the Muslim world.

Nelson prepares to capture neutrinos a half-mile underground

By Tim Jones
March 23, 2005
Deep underground in an old iron mine, William and Mary Assistant Physics Professor Jeff Nelson will help a team of scientists capture thousands of elusive subatomic particles. Called neutrinos, these minuscule bits of matter will be beamed hundreds of miles through the earth as part of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory’s (Fermilab) $178 million Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS).

Q&A with Malone
Part 1: Participating in the trial of Saddam

By Brian Whitson
March 22, 2005
Law professor Linda Malone, along with her students, are writing legal briefs for use in the trial of Saddam Hussein and, potentially, other Iraqi war criminals. She spoke with the William and Mary News about the Special Iraqi Tribunal and the role her students will play.

Van Dover’s deep-sea dives common, but never routine, for students

By Suzanne Seurattan
March 17, 2005
In what has become an annual event, associate professor Cindy Van Dover is taking students on dives to the bottom of the ocean.

Fuchs and Tiefel diverge on medical ethics

By David Williard
March 17, 2005
The ethics of stem-cell research revolves around the issue of personhood, Alan Fuchs and Hans Tiefel agreed during a debate on the ethics of the practice sponsored by Swem Library. Defining personhood became a point of divergence.

Melvin Patrick Ely wins prestigious Bancroft Prize

By Brian Whitson
March 16, 2005
Melvin Patrick Ely, professor of history and black studies at the College of William and Mary, has been awarded the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History for his book “Israel on the Appomattox: A Southern Experiment in Black Freedom from the 1790s Through the Civil War,” thus becoming the second faculty member to win the award while at the College.

Always a face
Higgins describes multi-dimensional identities in Palestinian memorial posters

By Meghan Williams ('05)
March 4, 2005
Professor Annie Higgins discusses the faces that adorn memorial posters spread throughout the Palestinian diaspora.

At William and Mary, Ghosh is mindful of an America becoming

By Jacob Rooksby (’04)
February 25, 2005
Guru Ghosh, director of global education at the Reves Center for International Studies, sees the best of what America can be on the campus of William and Mary.

Hans von Baeyer: Primed for conversation

By David Williard
February 24, 2005
Hans Christian von Baeyer is primed for conversation. He talks about his transformation from a researcher to a popularizer of physics, his vocation as a teacher and his respect for students at William and Mary.

Q&A: Hans von Baeyer on the order of things

By David Williard
February 24, 2005
Physicist Hans von Baeyer explains what we need to know about the order of things.

Sonn traces rights in Islamic law

By Tim Jones
February 24, 2005
Though often misrepresented and misunderstood in the West, Islamic law has always contained elements of human rights, Tamara Sonn, Kenan Professor of Humanities in the department of religious studies, said at a law-school event.

Sociology Professor Kate Slevin receives state’s top award

By Brian Whitson
February 15, 2005
Kate Slevin, the Chancellor Professor of Sociology, was selected as one of a dozen statewide recipients of the 2005 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award sponsored by Dominion. The award is the highest honor given to faculty in Virginia.

Writer-in-residence Cole extracts hope from poetic struggle

By David Williard
February 9, 2005
Henri Cole (’78) enters the poetic solitude and brings forth the perfect metered words that flesh out disgust and delight forever entangled in transient existence.

Professor Jim Moliterno shares Legal Skills with Serbian law schools

By Allison N. Sawyer (’07)
February 7, 2005
William and Mary Law Professor Jim Moliterno has designed a research, writing, and ethics course for Serbian law schools which is modeled on William and Mary’s award-winning Legal Skills Program.

No saint: James Bill sent off into retirement

By David Williard
February 2, 2005
More than 100 guests attended a retirement dinner for Government Professor James Bill on Jan. 21.

McCord receives College’s highest honor for service
He has linked town and gown

By David Williard
January 27, 2005
James McCord, chair of the College’s history department, has received the Jefferson Award, William and Mary’s highest honor for faculty service.

A passionate approach
Professor Tom Linneman to be honored with Jefferson award

By Brian Whitson
January 19, 2005
At this year’s Charter Day celebration, sociology professor Tom Linneman will be awarded with the 2005 Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award. In his seventh year at the College, Linneman has developed a reputation among his students as a demanding professor – but one who genuinely cares about them.

For the love of Latin
Lectureship honors Ward Jones

By David Williard
January 13, 2005
Former students of Ward Jones have honored their former professor by helping establish an annual lecture series in his name.

Olbrych explores history of guitar on his first CD

By Tim Jones
January 10, 2005
Performing Arts Faculty Member Tim Olbrych recently released his first album, 500 Years of Spanish Guitar available online at www.timolbrych.com.

Intravenous knowledge for Sudan
Abdalla gets educational supplies to his war-ravaged homeland

By David Williard
January 7, 2005
Ismail Abdalla has helped keep Western knowledge alive during 20 years of civil war in Sudan.

Hart's restless adventure
English professor follows in the footsteps of his great-grandfather

By David Williard
January 3, 2005
Henry Hart is restless in the sense that his adventurous great-grandfather, the "Duke of Mongolia, was—Hart's restlessness, however, is of a literary sort.

Axtell first W&M faculty named to AAAS
Scholar shares vision for higher ed and for W&M

By David Williard
December 10, 2004
Kenan Professor of Humanities James Axtell has become the first William and Mary faculty member admitted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He shares his thoughts about Academe and about William and Mary.

Government students observe elections—in Mexico

By Suzanne Seurattan
December 9, 2004
George Grayson recently took his class to the State of Sinaloa, Mexico, to observe the way our southern neighbors campaign and vote.

Playwrights' Playground bolsters writing through performance

By David Williard
November 18, 2004
Playwriting students in professor Laurie Wolf's theatre class find performance helps in the playwriting process.

Pulitzer-winning historian proves a good neighbor

By Jacob Rooksby (’04)
November 4, 2004
Rhys Isaac, a Pulitzer-prize winning historian, introduced Jacob Rooksby, who was living next to the professor in Colonial Williamsburg, to the protagonist of his latest book.

Hancock leads students through geology's larger classrooms

By Tim Jones
November 4, 2004
Geologists have a bit of an advantage when it comes to teaching, admits Assistant Professor Greg Hancock. After all, they do have larger classrooms. “We’re lucky because we’ve got the entire world outside to show students how we think about geology,” he says.

William and Mary in 1965
Does the past portend the future?

By David Williard
November 4, 2004
During a recent lecture to alumni, Professor David L. Holmes talked about a College hampered by “pitiful” underfunding and faculty paid at less-than-competitive wages. Later he drew lessons for the future.

Rapoport and students make sense of exit polls

By Staff
November 4, 2004
Students in Government Professor Ron Rapoport’s Political Polling and Analysis class struggled to figure out why exit polls they conducted during the 2004 presidential elections followed the pattern of others conducted nationwide. In both cases, the polls seemed wrong.

‘Politics of Compassion’ topic for Barnes

By Tim Jones
October 21, 2004
According to literary and political narratives, America’s ideal president embodies a combination of strength and care, said Elizabeth Barnes at the sixth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture.

Government panelists agreed
Elections remain too close to call

By David Williard
October 21, 2004
Four panelists agreed in late October that the 2004 national elections remained too close to call.

Humanity discovered in the French concentration camps
Cate-Arries’ book seeks the spirit of the Spanish exile

By David Williard
October 7, 2004
Francie Cate-Arries' first book is not the one she set out to write. Entitled Spanish Culture Behind Barbed Wire, her account of the Spanish exile experience in French concentration camps following Franco's coup in 1939 was to be at most an introduction to her intended celebration of the contributions approximately 25,000 of the exiles ultimately would make in the cultural life of Mexico City.

Shakespeare festival appoints new artistic director

By staff
October 6, 2004
Christopher Owens has been appointed as the new artistic director for the Virginia Shakespeare Festival, taking over for the festival's founder, Jerry Bledsoe who will stay on board through the 2005 season as executive director.

‘Survival of the disciplines’
Sciences win College’s Raft Debate

By Meghan Williams (’05)
October 4, 2004
The sciences, represented by John Wells, dean of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, won the College’s Raft Debate, an annual battle of the academic disciplines.

School of Education establishes Children's Art Collection

By Brian Whitson
September 29, 2004
At a Sept. 27 ceremony with young artists from D. J. Montague Elementary, Dean Virginia McLaughlin welcomed the first holdings of the newly created School of Education Children’s Art Collection. To be displayed in a faculty lounge and conference room at the school’s offices in Jones Hall, the collection was established to honor outstanding examples of art created by young students attending local schools.

On Israel Hill
Black community pursued pre-Civil War freedoms

By David Williard
September 23, 2004
Melvin Ely’s recently published Israel on the Appomattox shows free blacks and whites living together haromiously in the early 19th century in Prince Edward County, Va., the same place that would close its schools rather than segregate them in 1959.

Liberals vs. conservatives
W&M economists say neither play nicer

By David Williard
September 23, 2004
Popular wisdom may depict liberals as more generous than conservatives when giving to public projects. Two W&M economists say that is a misperception.

Discussion of diversity flows from Schechter's ‘Obstinate Hebrews’

By David Williard
August 23, 2004
Associate history professor Ronald Schechter, whose book, “Obtinate Hebrews,” has received the David H. Pinkney Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies, talks about the 18th-century Jewish questions in France and about the quest for diversity today.

Moore ‘constructs’ communities of classrooms

By Staff
August 5, 2004
William and Mary's John Noell Moore has established himself as a pre-eminent teacher of teachers. This Q&A examines some of his throughts on the teaching process.

Van Dover heading to France as Fulbright Scholar

By Suzanne Seurattan
July 12, 2004
Biology Professor Cindy Van Dover will be studying in France this year on a Fulbright Scholarship.

For Wednesday Lunch Group it’s all about the conversation

By David Williard
July 8, 2004
For more than 50 years, a dozen faculty members have been getting together on Wednesdays for lunch and some hassle-free quality conversation.

School of Education donors love to 'Honor an Educator'

By Brian Whitson
July 8, 2004
The William and Mary School of Education started a new fund-raising program last year that allows donors to honor an educator from their past.

John Morreall, professor of religion

By staff
July 7, 2004
Bio information and hi-res photos for William and Mary Professor of Religion John Morreall, an internationally renowned humor studies scholar.
See also:
>A different kind of humor: in class with John Morreall
>A healthy, humorous workplace: Q&A with John Morreall

Kinesiology department promotes successful living at ‘The Landing’

By Suzanne Seurattan
June 9, 2004
The College's kinesiologists are working to keep elder residents at Williamsburg Landing active.

Gauthier receives Graves Award
Gymnastics coach gets teaching honor

By Brian Whitson
May 28, 2004
Cliff Gauthier, who has become an icon among NCAA gymnastics coaches, received the College's highest honor “sustained excellence” in teaching.

A different kind of humor
Tuition serves as cover charge in Morreall’s class

By Tim Jones
May 27, 2004
Religion Professor John Morreall has become an expert in humor; he uses it to keep his class thinking freely.

Crossing the line between professor and mentor
Holmes believes in the life of the mind

By Peyton Cooke (’04)
May 13, 2004
Religion Professor David Holmes models the “life of the mind.”

Cuban-class mutiny: Students seize control of the learning process

By David Williard
May 11, 2004

When students in Professor Ann Marie Stock's Hispanic studies 392 class wanted to take over, she encouraged the mutiny. In the end, everyone benefitted.

Axtell named fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

By Suzanne Seurattan
May 7, 2004
James L. Axtell, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Humanities in the William and Mary department of history, was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on April 30.

Strikwerda named Dean of Faculty at College

By Bill Walker
May 4, 2004
Carl Strikwerda, at present the associate dean of the college of liberal arts and sciences of the University of Kansas, has been named dean of the faculty of arts and sciences at the College of William and Mary.

College Provost outlines vision for W&M

By (Staff)
April 29, 2004
Geoffrey Feiss wants William and Mary to be one of the world’s great institutions of higher education.

Starnes’ patent promises better plastic along with safer world

By Tim Jones
April 27, 2004
William Starnes, the College’s Floyd Dewey Gottwald, Sr. Professor of Chemistry, has patented organic stabilizers for PVCs that could save lives.

Beers reaches for higher level of communication

By David Williard
April 26, 2004
The inability of many students to communicate is a recurring challenge for the hundreds of teachers who have come to the Eastern Virginia Writing Project, says Jim Beers. He helps the teachers help the students to communicate with words rather than fists.

Jim Beers, professor of reading, language and literacy

By staff
April 22, 2004
Jim Beers biographical information. Beers is the director of the EVWP and professor of reading, language and literacy at William and Mary.
See also:
Beers reaches for higher level of communication

Q&A with W&M's John Foubert, founder of "One in Four"

By Brian Whitson
April 16, 2004
John Foubert, assistant professor of higher education at W&M, discusses the rape prevention education program he developed and recent reports of sexual assault involving the football program at the University of Colorado.

Re-accreditation process to enhance teaching and learning at the College

By Bill Walker
April 8, 2004
There will be no loud groans or pointless ordeals involved with the re-accreditation process, promises David Aday, director of the process. He believes enhanced teaching and learning will result.

Environmentally teaching
Hugging trees no longer cuts it

By Cindy Baker
April 7, 2004
ENST 101 and 102 is a cross-disciplinary effort to bring focus to environmental issues.

U.S. and Iran remain on ‘collision course’ says Bill

By Bill Walker
March 19, 2004
“Iran and the United States remain on a collision course,” James Bill, professor of government, told a large gathering of scholars, diplomats and officials at Washington’s Middle East Institute. “While Iran stands as a regional hegemon in the oil-rich Persian Gulf, the United State is the global hegemon,” he said.

Should God be in the Pledge of Allegiance

By D. Christopher Williard
February 9, 2004
Rev. John Rankin and religion professor Hans Tiefel debate whether God shoud be in the Pledge of Allegiance.

Walecka Gets State Lifetime Achievement Award

By (Staff)
February 2, 2004

Two William and Mary Faculty Members Receive State's Top Award

By Brian Whitson, W&M News
January 30, 2004
Two faculty members at William and Mary, John Graves and Chi-Kwong Li, were among the 11 statewide recipients of the 2004 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award. The award is the Commonwealth of Virginia's highest honor for faculty at colleges and universities.

Associate Professor Todd Mooradian Receives 2005 Fulbright Award

By Staff
January 30, 2004
Tood Mooradian, associate professor of marketing at the William and Mary School of Business, was recently awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to spend four months conducting research in Austria.

Hurricane Damage Leads to "Microburst" Research in College Woods

By Brian Whitson, W&M News
January 22, 2004
Biology Professor Stewart Ware and freshman Kate Prengaman will track Hurricane Isabel damage in College Woods. Previous study of the trees in College Woods will allow for unique research.

Scholnick Gives Where It's Near and Dear

By Development staff
January 16, 2004
Robert J. Scholnick's private donations to the College support his intellectual investments.

Rising Sea Level Increases Hurricane Risk

By Dave Malmquist
December 15, 2003
VIMS professor emeritus John Boon says future hurricanes will create greater problems due to flooding.

Herron is Back in the 'Conversation'

By David Williard
December 12, 2003
Carolivia Herron, author of "Nappy Hair" and "Thereafter Johnnie," is finding peace as the College's writer-in-residence.

Dignity for the Living

By David Williard
December 12, 2003
Michael Blakey, who led scientific exploration of Manhattan's African Burial Grounds, discusses what was learned about 18th-slavery in New York and ponders lessons of the reinterment for today.

Seeking Social Insights from the Apes

By Cindy Baker
November 14, 2003
Barbara King, professor of anthropology, uses the lens of dynamic systems theory to analyze the textured social interactions among great apes.

Diaries from the Deep

By (Staff)
November 7, 2003

Inquiring Minds Equal Excellent Educators

By John Wallace
November 4, 2003
Five faculty have received Fellowship Awards from the Alumni Association based on their outstanding qualities of mentoring William and Mary students.

Classical Childplay: Oakley co-curator of major exhibit

By David Williard
October 30, 2003
John Oakley, chair of the College's department of classical studies, is co-curator of a groundbreaking museum exhibit dealing with childhood in ancient Greece.

Strange Quarks

By Tim Jones
October 30, 2003
David Armstrong, associate professor of physics, talked about the strangeness of quarks while delivering the College's 2003 Distinguished Faculty Lecture.

Diggin' Werowocomoco

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

Passin' On 'Old-Time'

By TimJones
October 23, 2003
Mike Seeger, the five-time Grammy nominated, internationally renowned folk musician, served as the music department’s Class of 1939 Artist-in-Residence.

Quixote-Quoting Sharpe Professor Lives His Dream

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003
Jonathan Arries helps students change their world.

Hansen's Joy 'Unconfined'

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

VIMS Founder Built Bridges in Science

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

Physics Professor Publishes Poems Celebrating 'Joy of Life'

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

Bagdassarian Receives T.J. Teaching Award

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

Classroom for the Millennium

By (Staff)
October 23, 2003

Passages to India

By David Williard
October 3, 2003
Students, instructor, cross cultures during summer service-learning project.

Research reports
Research reports highlight areas of scientific inquiry at the College.

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Faculty Profiles
A collection of faculty profiles from the William and Mary News

In-Class Features
A collection of in-class feature stories taken from the William and Mary News.

Questions and Answers
A collection of Q&A's taken from the William and Mary News.

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