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VIMS students recognized at national conference

Six graduate students from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, took home awards for their presentations during the Estuarine Research Federation's annual meeting in Norfolk.

The Estuarine Research Federation (ERF) is the nation's leading scientific society devoted to the study and management of estuaries and the effects of human activities on these fragile environments. The 1,200-member federation includes a unique mix of academic researchers, public-sector managers, teachers, consultants, and students.

Graduate student Malcolm Scully received third place in the graduate student competition for his talk on turbulent mixing in estuaries. Jessie Campbell won an honorable mention for her talk on the ecological factors affecting the germination of sea-grass seeds. David Gillett, Grace Henderson, Frank Parker, and Adriana Veloza were recognized as among the top 50 student presenters.

Scully, a Ph.D. student under faculty adviser Dr. Carl Friedrichs, won the $300 third-place prize for his study of how differences in water density affect residual flow in the York River and other similar estuary systems.

Campbell, a masterís student under faculty adviser Dr. Ken Moore, received honorable mention for her study of seed germination in a type of sea grass called wild celery (Vallisneria americana).

Gillett, a Ph.D. student under faculty advisor Dr. Linda Schaffner, was recognized for his study of the relationship between the health of bottom habitats and their ability to support fish and other animals higher up the food chain.

Henderson, a Ph.D. student under faculty adviser Dr. Deborah Steinberg, was acknowledged for her efforts to better understand how feeding by zooplankton affects carbon and nutrient cycling in estuarine and marine systems.

Parker, a Ph.D. student under faculty adviser Dr. Iris Anderson, was recognized for his presentation on how carbon and nutrient cycling is affected by the microscopic plant community that lives atop sunlit sediments.

Veloza, a master's student under faculty advisers Drs. Fu-Lin Chu and Kam Tang, was recognized for her presentation on "trophic upgrading."

Photo: Six graduate students from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science took home awards for their presentations during the Estuarine Research Federation's Annual Meeting in Norfolk, Virginia in October. Back row from L to R: Frank Parker, David Gillett, and Malcolm Scully. Front row from L to R: Grace Henderson, Adriana Veloza, and Jessie Campbell. Courtesy VIMS.

For more information, see the VIMS Web site.

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